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How To Build A Programmatic Sales Team

brianmikaliseditedThe Sell Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Brian Mikalis, senior vice president of monetization at Pandora.

Publishers that sell directly to advertisers and agencies are now faced with how to handle programmatic sales.

Traditional RFPs have recently started including questions about publishers' programmatic capabilities and data sharing, as well as requirements around automating the buying process for upfront and longer-term deals. This has shifted rapidly over the past year, and publisher sales teams without answers to these questions will be at a disadvantage.

So how should publishers set up their sales organization so they’re equipped to take advantage of this ever-changing landscape?

The first thing to do is consider which stage your organization is in with regard to understanding programmatic and its willingness to adapt, embrace and devote resources to making programmatic a part of the sales offering.

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Can The ANA Save Digital Advertising?

spanfeller-sell-siderThe Sell Sider” is a column written by the sell-side of the digital media community.

Today's column is written by Jim Spanfeller, CEO at Spanfeller Media Group,

The Association of National Advertisers (ANA) recently joined online fraud-detection firm White Ops for an effort called “The Marketers’ Coalition.” Together they will look into the issues of impression fraud in the digital advertising ecosystem caused by bots. This is the most direct move yet by America’s major marketers to fully engage in the transactional elements of the digital space.

Can the ANA and its members save the digital advertising business? Not only do I believe they can, I think this is just the beginning of the process. What’s more, this might be one of those “just in time” moments.

First off, why do they want to? Well, that is a fairly straightforward thought process.  To some extent, any company that counts on mass consumer adoption to be successful (and depending on how you define it, this means just about every company, of any size, out there  whether it is B-to-C or B-to-B) counts on advertising success as part of its core business model.

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Everyone Has A Monetization Platform For Publishers

wenner-media-michael-persaud-sell-sider

The Sell Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community. Receive The Sell Sider in your inbox twice a week by signing up for the email here, and selecting The Publisher Newsletter. 

Today’s column is written by Michael Persaud, director of programmatic advertising at Wenner Media.

The publisher-facing ad technology ecosystem continues to evolve. Spend a few months out of the loop and you'll return to a new world.

When given the responsibility of managing all "secondary" revenue sources, my team inadvertently was given the keys to the kingdom. We had to vet all new media platforms, SSPs, DSPs, DMPs, exchanges, networks and ad tech in-betweeners.

Once the word was out, we became the “go-to” contacts and were hit with a barrage of emails about new “game-changing” products. It started with a few pitches a week. Then it turned into a flood.

Out of necessity, we quickly became adept at evaluating platforms and answering some key questions. Where do you start? How do you evaluate the merits of cold-calling vendors? How do you test them?

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Mobile Myths That Drive Publishers Onto The Ledge

stevegoldbergThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Steve Goldberg, digital practice lead at EmpiricalMedia.

Mobile — and making sense of mobile — simply perplexes people. I have numerous even-tempered clients and colleagues who have been driven into a rage when tasked with creating presentations on mobile.

One reason is that the expectations for most on the sell side are not aligned with reality. A survey of trade articles makes you feel confident that marketers are cataclysmically underspending on mobile. Furthermore, you may also learn that most sellers make no mobile revenue at all or that everyone but you makes tons money on location-based ads.

Since all of this can’t all be true at the same time, let’s look at some popular mobile myths and bust ‘em up.

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‘Pipe’ Dreams

jeremyhlavacekeditedThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today's column is written by Jeremy Hlavacek, vice president for programmatic at The Weather Company.

It looks like a good year to be a VC or investment banker.

IPOs continue rolling out, and there is also a lot of healthy M&A activity in the tech and media space. I’m no financier, but I see one trend that stands out: The market loves fresh new scale, and nothing else matters. This trend is best illustrated by two recent deals: WhatsApp and the Washington Post.

Facebook bought WhatsApp for $19 billion, while WaPo went to Jeff Bezos for $250 million. These transactions valued WhatsApp at nearly 80 times the Washington Post. WhatsApp is a mobile messaging platform that was invented five years ago and currently has no revenue. The Washington Post, a renowned content and journalism company founded in 1877, generated $581.7 million in overall revenue in 2012.

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Transparency And Privacy: It’s Time To Clean Up Our Acts

spanfeller-sell-siderThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today's column is written by Jim Spanfeller, CEO at Spanfeller Media Group.

No news here, but we have devolved into a short-term focused economy. That is as true in digital as it is elsewhere.

There are many examples of where this thinking causes deep pain in the long-term prospects for individual companies and for our industry as a whole. Perhaps the most important examples are the twin topics of privacy and transparency.

In both cases, we can go back to Abe Lincoln’s ascribed axiom: “You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.”

I think most independent-thinking folks in our industry — meaning those not directly aligned with companies that benefit from privacy infringements or a wholesale lack of transparency (you know who you are) — can see a future where one or both of the following is the norm, and not the exception.

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What Is ‘Premium’ In Mobile?

bobwalczaksellsiderThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Bob Walczak, general manager of mobile and video at PubMatic.

When it comes to publishers, premium is the operative word, a designation that, like VIP access to any major event, opens up a whole new world of possibilities.

We know what premium inventory is when it comes to desktop, but as you’re likely aware, we’re living in an increasingly mobile-driven world. How many times have we all heard the eMarketer prediction that by 2017 mobile display advertising will hit $31.1 billion in the United States alone?

As with any segment that is scaling so quickly, this growth begs the question of what “premium” means for mobile. Regardless of whether the inventory is mobile-only or multiscreen, there are five key characteristics that I believe define premium inventory among publishers in the mobile arena.

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Demystifying Programmatic: A Guide For Premium Publishers

richardjalichandrasellsiderThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Richard Jalichandra, CEO at iSocket.

Programmatic media buying, from RTB to fixed-price reserved, is quickly becoming the way of the future.

It’s clear why buyers are interested in programmatic —increased efficiency and lower costs — but there are major efficiency and cost-saving benefits for publishers too.

That said, even when the need for programmatic is clear, the programmatic options available to premium publishers are not always so easy to navigate.

Bringing it back to basics, there are five categories of ad selling available to premium publishers, four of which are programmatic. Here’s an overview of all five, with a look at why you might want to use them, Keep in mind that many publishers use some combination of these methods, if not all five.

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The New Big Event Marketing Strategy: Planned Spontaneity

jeremysteinbergThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Jeremy Steinberg, senior vice president of digital ad sales for The Weather Company.

It is big event season and the marketplace is abuzz. The sheer number of big event opportunities in the first three months of the year is enough to make any marketer’s mouth water, including the Super Bowl, Olympics, Oscars, Grammys and the Golden Globes, to name a few. What great opportunities to harness these powerful moments with unique messaging that impacts paid, owned and earned media.

But there is a problem with this strategy: The results can be fleeting.

I am sure many people will tell you that these high-profile events move product and build key brand metrics better than any other event. They say the best way to accelerate earned media is to leverage the immediacy of a big moment with a relevant message.

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The Current, Current Thing

spanfeller-sell-siderThe Sell-Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today's column is written by Jim Spanfeller, CEO at Spanfeller Media Group.

At the end of the last century Michael Lewis penned the insightful and educational story of Jim Clark’s efforts to change the health industry.

Clark’s efforts eventually led to the creation of WebMD, albeit with a vastly different model than the one under which the company presently operates. The book was titled “The New, New Thing” and turned out to be instructional not only in what Jim Clark was up to but was in fact extremely insightful around all things Web…and in part most things disruptive (although to borrow from Joseph Schumpeter, "creative destruction" has been a part of the economic landscape since the 1950s).

That “The New, New Thing” was written before 2000 seems crazy to me. The fundamental concepts are as real today as they were then. And within those concepts is a certain amount of skepticism around how, well, new some things actually are. This is a thesis that holds true today, that the digital ecosystem is in love with the idea of “new.” That there is almost nothing that is new enough, if you follow me.

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