RSS FeedArchive for the ‘Data-Driven Thinking’ Category


Your Ad Was Displayed Cross-Screen, But Was It Actually Seen?

jeffbandersellsider"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Ephraim Bander, president and chief revenue officer at Sticky.

The simple days of advertising to consumers via television, radio, and print are gone for good. These mediums still exist and remain popular, but digital advertising is taking an increasingly large share of the market. It’s challenging the status quo, not just as a desired advertising platform, but also for optimal campaign planning and ad execution.

The medium also continues to change quickly. Digital advertising has moved well beyond banner ads to reach consumers on their mobile phones and tablets, and even through digital out-of-home (DOOH) screens.

With all of these screens, we can reach consumers in more places than ever before, but that brings with it the possibility of information overload. A consumer can easily tire of or ignore certain ads if they show up on every screen they see. Cross-screen marketing has emerged as a way to help brands get their message to consumers across devices in a smart, cohesive way, extending reach while using techniques such as frequency capping to make sure consumers aren’t inundated.

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Bridge The Artificial Divide In Digital Commerce

yarivdrori"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Yariv Drori, CEO at AY Digital.

The view of digital marketing service industry from 1,000 feet reveals a patchwork of technology vendors. Some offer service layers that are highly tailored to their specific technical solutions. Others simply expect brands to adopt self-serviced platforms.

Ascend to 10,000 feet. You’ll find the patchwork split between services geared toward customer acquisition (media) or conversion (ecommerce).

As a result, brands are often forced to manage separate lines of engagement with their audience. One involves reaching out and bringing visitors to their site and the other converts those visitors into customers. It’s an artificial split because, from a customer standpoint, the engagement with a product or brand is continuous and ongoing.

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Software vs. Services: Is There Really A Difference?

martinkihnData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Martin Kihn, research director at Gartner.

The fast-twitch distinctions between agencies and marketing software, low-margin analysts and high-margin code, are rapidly disappearing.

Inspired by their investors, software startups trip over themselves to show how hands-free they are. Meanwhile, many solutions are sold to customers who either staff up to support them or pay agencies to run them, making data scientist the "sexiest job of the 21st century," according to the Harvard Business Review.

The software providers themselves have hardly succeeded in keeping humans off their books. Many of the more interesting companies are primarily managed services, from social analytics firm Synthesio to ad server Trueffect. Even quintessential software-as-a-service (SaaS) shops like Google quietly offer on-demand professionals to support higher-end products, such as Google Analytics Premium and rich-media creative units. And the fastest-growing teams at digital marketing startups are customer care representatives, who are essentially consultants.

It turns out there is probably no enterprise software worth using that is so simple anyone can run it.

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What The Mobile App Industry Can Learn From King Kullen

josefmandelbaumddt"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Josef Mandelbaum, CEO at Perion Network.

In 1930, Kroger Grocery & Bakery Co. store manager Michael Cullen came up with the idea for the model that would become the modern supermarket.

Instead of making daily trips to the grocer, baker, butcher and milkman, Cullen envisioned a "one-stop shop" for meat, milk, cheese, produce and bread that was almost entirely a "self-service" operation.

Stocking large quantities of food items would reduce prices, attract more shoppers and produce a stronger bottom line, he argued. When Kroger's ignored him, Cullen opened the first King Kullen Grocery Co. in Queens, N.Y., followed by an additional eight stores that generated more than $6 million a year in revenue (nearly $100 million in 2014 dollars).

Similar to the pre-Kullen’s shopping experience, the mobile app advertising industry is a broken, fragmented and complex ecosystem that makes it difficult for even the largest industry players to successfully execute a media-buying campaign.

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Every Day Should Be Black Friday

lunghuangnew"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Lung Huang, vice president of digital advertising and global partnerships at dunnhumby.

Here it is: Holiday Season 2014. Already.

Before you could pry your sugary fingers away from the last piece of non-GMO, non-high fructose corn syrup Halloween candy, the nation of good and plenty fervently began convincing shoppers that it was time for holiday shopping.

Not in December. Not on Black Friday. Right. Now.

The National Retail Federation predicts holiday spending will reach $616.9 billion this year, a 4.1% increase over 2013. That means we will spend about $80 more this year for every man, woman and child living in the United States.

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How Are You Measuring Video ROI?

benleggddtEditor’s note: The below column has been significantly updated from the version published Monday morning.

"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Ben Legg, CEO at Adknowledge.

Video is digital advertising’s biggest opportunity. I talk with a lot of marketers, including clients, business partners and friends, about where the industry is headed. The question I increasingly hear is, “How much should I spend, and what is the ROI vs. other forms of advertising?”

To be clear, this is not about the end game of TV or video advertising. As soon as all TVs become smart, the word “digital” will be dropped because everything will be digital. TVs will become just another screen to add to the mix of laptops, tablets and smart phones which consumers already digest content on and interact with. TV schedules – apart from live events, such as sports and “The Voice” – will become a thing of the past.

Content will be a mixture of paid (ad-free), free (with ads) and some kind of ad-subsidized model, which is a hybrid of the two. All ads will be targeted based on viewer data, relevant content and price. Nearly all TV advertising as we know it will disappear and become digital/programmatic. The boundaries between TV advertising and video advertising will all but disappear. TV and video advertising combined will become a $200 billion per year global industry.

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As Big Data Moves In-House, Agencies Evolve

timmayerupdatedData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Tim Mayer, chief marketing officer at Trueffect.

Smart enterprises nurture their best assets. Not surprisingly, data has recently taken the coveted second-place position behind companies’ most valuable asset: employees.

Companies have large amounts of data that they want to translate into intelligence, and they’ve begun treating this data differently. For many, this difference means using strong on-staff analysts, known as quants, to mine the data in-house instead of outsourcing it to an agency or partner.

Increasingly, technology-savvy CMOs partner with their CIOs to make decisions on their organization’s marketing technology. These partnerships lead to new requirements and perspectives on how these technologies should interact, with areas such as data security being pushed to the forefront in this evaluation process.

At this year’s AdExchanger Programmatic IO conference, Joanna O’Connell, research director at AdExchanger, discussed three ways to take programmatic media in-house: agency-led, agency-involved and in-house. The first option, agency-led, is the default approach for most companies. The agency-involved route, which is rapidly gaining popularity, allows enterprises evaluate technologies directly and own the relationships with advertising technology vendors. The third option, in-house, is still very rare.

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‘M’ Stands For More Than Mobile

laurenmoores“Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Lauren Moores, vice president of analytics at Dstillery.

Millennials. Multicultural. Multicultural millennials.

If you are a marketer, chances are these “M” words keep you up at night. It makes sense. These are big demographic groups with big spending potential and lots of loyalty up for grabs.

The millennial generation, born between roughly 1980 and 2000, represents approximately 80 million people. Multicultural, also a broad term, refers to multiple and mixed ethnicities and backgrounds, but can include African-American, Asian, Hispanic and LGBT audiences. The combined millennial and multicultural audiences (MMC) represent nearly 40% of the US population. For marketers, they are the “next-generation consumer,” and generally the major growth vehicle for their brands.

It also makes sense that there is behavioral divergence within the millennial, multicultural and MMC labels. There’s research to support disparities on everything from brand loyalty and trust in user-generated content to media usage.

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In The Fight Against Mobile Ad Fraud, Science Trumps Spam

ivanzalameaddtData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Ivan Zalamea, data scientist at PlaceIQ.

In digital advertising, fraud is a reality everyone must learn to deal with and adapt to. The mobile ecosystem is no exception, and it’s increasingly sprinkled with low-quality location data.

While the majority of mobile location data is of good quality, digital contamination brings unfortunate results, including spammy requests, industrywide hesitation and subpar ROI for brands.

At this critical time, when mobile is not only booming but also being combined with other powerful mediums, such as television, marketers need the best location data available. That’s where data scientists come in. Their roles are varied, but all data scientists share at least one common goal: to ensure the quality of data.

My background is in astrophysics, where we use connections and correlations to reveal the mysteries of the universe. The universe is vast, but to study it, we zero in on individual elements that make up the whole. Similarly, in the era of big data, it’s not the size of the data that matters most, but the actionable pieces of information that can be derived from that data. Understanding the many parts and layers involved make it possible to create a coherent picture of the validity of ad requests.

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Attribution's Fatal Flaw: What Really Caused That Conversion?

danhillddtData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Dan Hill, senior data scientist at Integral Ad Science.

How effective was the last ad campaign you worked on? What was the return on investment?

Chances are you don't know. It's all too common to leave ROI performance unmeasured. Advertisers often have no idea whether their budget was spent wisely or if it was even profitable to advertise in the first place.

Attribution providers can help answer these questions. They're paid to estimate the effectiveness of ad campaigns. Each attribution provider has its own proprietary model for how to divide up credit for every conversion to the ad impressions that touched it. The most famous of these models is called last-touch attribution, where all credit is given to the last impression that the customer saw before converting. More advanced models use sophisticated sets of equations to assign credit along the entire path that the customer takes through the campaign, from touchpoint to touchpoint.

Simple or complex, the problem with these models is that they only measure how many conversions were touched by the campaign rather than how many were caused by the campaign. Unless you can tell the difference, it's impossible to evaluate how successful the campaign was.

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