RSS FeedArchive for the ‘Data-Driven Thinking’ Category


Branded Content With ‘Good Enough’ Writing Will Sink Native

scottallan"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Scott Allan, chief marketing officer at AddThis.

Billions of dollars are being poured into content these days. Chief content officers are in demand, commanding six-figure salaries, while 71% of marketers plan to increase their content marketing budgets in 2014. BIA/Kelsey estimates that investments in native advertising will reach $5 billion by 2017, a startling forecast in a category hatched just a few years ago.

Everyone agrees that content is king. But will all the money flowing into content marketing help or hurt brands given the questionable value of what’s been published over the past decade?

The demand for fresh content and the need to fill the space left behind by laid-off journalists led to a deluge of contributed pieces that many consider far from insightful or unbiased. And since the material is optimized for keywords, the content continues to resurface long after its shelf life has expired. This makes it harder, not easier for customers to find the information they need.

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Financial Services Firms Need A Healthier Advertising Ecosystem

henrikrodeData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Henrik Rode, partner at MediaGroup Performance.

Programmatic is a natural fit for financial services firms, but several large obstacles need to be overcome.

First, traditional financial media is too expensive, buying options are limited and the access to audiences is not great. On the other side, buyers are too conservative and don’t always measure results or look at ROI.

Let me expand on that. To begin with, premium financial publishers price their inventory according to financial industry earnings. The perceived brand value of these publishers is higher than those of other industries, so overall, prices are inflated, even among the non-premium publishers. As a result, innovation is slow to occur compared to other industries, as there just isn’t the same incentivizing pressure.

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How Should I Evaluate Media Tech Companies?

marcusprattupdated"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Marcus Pratt, vice president of insights and technology at Mediasmith.

Part of my job involves evaluating media technology companies. This is extremely fun but is sometimes frustrating. The vibrant marketing tech economy creates many choices for buyers, but finding points of differentiation is not always easy.

Worse yet, the definition of a technology company is murky, at best. Here are some of the questions I ask myself when evaluating media technology offerings.

1. Am I buying technology or service? 

Many media technology offerings are not actually selling technology, or perhaps technology is a very slim part of the offering. Sometimes the company is really selling service or offering media buying. To help figure out what is actually being sold, I ask to see a demo early on. Any company operating on a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model should be eager to show off its user interface. Offerings that rely more heavily on service or bundle their technology along with media buying are more likely to have technology offerings that are implemented “on the back end” by a specialized team.

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Retailers Are From Mars, Brands Are From Venus

justin-pettyData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Justin Petty, vice president of global media and partnerships at dunnhumby.

When I worked as an analytics consultant in the telecom industry 10 years ago, the incumbent approach was to find the best people to sell DSL to and send them direct mail offers. Then we found the best people to sell long distance to and sent them direct mail offers. As the product set grew to include TV service and mobile service, it became apparent that starting with the customer and determining the best products for individuals was more efficient – and more effective.

I then worked in the DIY home-improvement and DIY auto-repair industries. I found that companies still took a product-centric approach to marketing.

The DIY home-improvement retailer, for example, would say it needed to run a wood flooring direct marketing (DM) campaign in March. Why? “That’s flooring month and we told the category manager we would run a DM campaign for them.” No data was used to determine consumers’ needs or the best time to promote certain products. Flipping the model upside down to start with the customer and identify, through the data, what they bought and when helped create a data-driven, customer-centric marketing calendar.

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A TV Buyer’s Wish List For Video

bill-dayData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Bill Day, CEO at Tremor Video.

Until recently, TV has been a relatively easy means to a reach and frequency end, but that’s not enough anymore. I doubt any big brand marketer or TV buyer disagrees.

What’s been missing is an easy, scalable and accountable way for TV advertising to cascade across screens and follow consumers and content everywhere. That’s why the hot topic of programmatic has rapidly escalated to the hotter interest in premium programmatic.

I believe premium programmatic is much more than the automated buying and selling of high-quality inventory, especially when using video in comparable ways to TV to achieve brand goals.

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The Evolution Of Programmatic RTB In A Mobile-First World

laurenmoores"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Lauren Moores, vice president of analytics at Dstillery.

When real-time bidding debuted at scale a few years ago, it was heavily associated with remnant inventory and direct-response campaigns. Fast forward to today, when RTB serves as a vehicle for upper-funnel marketing and a core strategy for accessing mobile consumers in an increasingly mobile world.

The growth in digital media is overwhelmingly driven by increased media consumption on mobile devices, and many of the impressions that once happened on desktop are now happening on those devices. Worldwide, there are now more RTB impressions on mobile phones than on desktop. In Europe, mobile RTB impressions grew by 43% in the third quarter of 2013, while tablet impressions increased by 102%, according to Adform’s 2013 RTB Trend Report.

With this growth, RTB has graduated from its position as a remnant channel to now starting to be perceived as a premium-branding channel. The expansion of programmatic from direct response to branding has been driven by both the rise in mobile adoption and the ability to intelligently serve ads to targeted audiences.

There are two factors that make real-time branding viable.

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How Big Data Can Make The Most Of Small Campaigns

frostprioleaurevised“Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Frost Prioleau, CEO and co-founder of Simpli.fi.

The average small and medium-sized business (SMB) in the US spends about $400 a month on marketing, according to the US Chamber of Commerce’s 2013 SMB Internet Marketing Survey. Of that $400, 46%, or $184, is dedicated to digital advertising.

For most local advertisers, the best route to leveraging digital for their business is through a locally focused advertising network or their local media publishers. These types of entities can coordinate their marketing budget across several channels including search, online directories, mobile and, increasingly, targeted display.

At first glance, it would seem that local advertisers have the most to gain from programmatic marketing, with its high volumes of inventory from which to choose, precision audience targeting, highly optimized campaigns and spending efficiency.

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Break Your Impression Addiction

marcustewksburyData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Marcus Tewksbury, global vice president for product strategy at Experian Marketing Services.

CMOs are still addicted to impressions. It doesn’t matter if they appear in banners, emails, 30-second spots, above the line or below it.

This seems counterintuitive to everything we read about big data, targeted ads and customer-centricity. Yet there is still a gulf between rhetoric and action in our industry. The proliferation of data has given us the ability to target audiences more precisely based on demographics, purchase history or behavior, but we want to do that at mass. Therefore, impressions are still our currency.

Marketing in a digital world requires that we strive to improve the customer experience and deliver a quality interaction every time, rather than just focusing on quantity, reach and volume. If the quality isn’t right, the volume can actually bend performance back into the negative. Doubling down on the old “at mass” techniques, regardless if they are data driven or not, just exacerbates the situation and creates noise that reinforces how little the brand knows or cares.

With the digital proliferation forever altering the equation between marketer and customer, the customer is now in control. CMOs seem to acknowledge this shift in power but have yet to move on from their formerly successful, volume-driven strategies. We need to give our CMO partners tangible steps for breaking their addiction and moving from the age of digital marketing to the age of marketing in a digital world.

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Location Accuracy: Three Common Questions

dansilverData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Dan Silver, director of marketing at xAd.

Things move quickly if you’re a mobile location technologist. A week can feel like three months, and if you’re not paying attention, it may seem like the world has passed you by.

That is also what it’s like for an agency media planner. That isn’t a knock on the planner, but a testament to their adaptability. The onus is on the technologist to make sure the media planner, agency or landscape, as a whole, understands the advantages they offer.

Among all the questions asked by agencies about mobile location accuracy, these are the most common:

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There's More To Programmatic Direct Than You Think: Reserved Vs. Unreserved

richardjalichandrasellsiderData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Richard Jalichandra, CEO at iSocket.

Though still an emerging industry segment, programmatic direct is fast becoming one of the most talked-about trends in ad tech. In spite of all this buzz – or perhaps because of it – there remains significant confusion about what is and isn't programmatic direct.

We have seen pieces explaining the difference between direct and indirect buying – specifically the distinctions between programmatic direct vs. open RTB – but that's not the only distinction at play.

The common misconception is that programmatic direct is one very specific type of media buying, but there are two very distinct categories: reserved and unreserved, both of which have advantages and disadvantages. The characteristic both share is a fixed price, but there are significant differences between "fixed price unreserved" and "fixed price reserved."

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