RSS FeedArchive for the ‘Data-Driven Thinking’ Category


‘M’ Stands For More Than Mobile

laurenmoores“Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Lauren Moores, vice president of analytics at Dstillery.

Millennials. Multicultural. Multicultural millennials.

If you are a marketer, chances are these “M” words keep you up at night. It makes sense. These are big demographic groups with big spending potential and lots of loyalty up for grabs.

The millennial generation, born between roughly 1980 and 2000, represents approximately 80 million people. Multicultural, also a broad term, refers to multiple and mixed ethnicities and backgrounds, but can include African-American, Asian, Hispanic and LGBT audiences. The combined millennial and multicultural audiences (MMC) represent nearly 40% of the US population. For marketers, they are the “next-generation consumer,” and generally the major growth vehicle for their brands.

It also makes sense that there is behavioral divergence within the millennial, multicultural and MMC labels. There’s research to support disparities on everything from brand loyalty and trust in user-generated content to media usage.

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In The Fight Against Mobile Ad Fraud, Science Trumps Spam

ivanzalameaddtData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Ivan Zalamea, data scientist at PlaceIQ.

In digital advertising, fraud is a reality everyone must learn to deal with and adapt to. The mobile ecosystem is no exception, and it’s increasingly sprinkled with low-quality location data.

While the majority of mobile location data is of good quality, digital contamination brings unfortunate results, including spammy requests, industrywide hesitation and subpar ROI for brands.

At this critical time, when mobile is not only booming but also being combined with other powerful mediums, such as television, marketers need the best location data available. That’s where data scientists come in. Their roles are varied, but all data scientists share at least one common goal: to ensure the quality of data.

My background is in astrophysics, where we use connections and correlations to reveal the mysteries of the universe. The universe is vast, but to study it, we zero in on individual elements that make up the whole. Similarly, in the era of big data, it’s not the size of the data that matters most, but the actionable pieces of information that can be derived from that data. Understanding the many parts and layers involved make it possible to create a coherent picture of the validity of ad requests.

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Attribution's Fatal Flaw: What Really Caused That Conversion?

danhillddtData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Dan Hill, senior data scientist at Integral Ad Science.

How effective was the last ad campaign you worked on? What was the return on investment?

Chances are you don't know. It's all too common to leave ROI performance unmeasured. Advertisers often have no idea whether their budget was spent wisely or if it was even profitable to advertise in the first place.

Attribution providers can help answer these questions. They're paid to estimate the effectiveness of ad campaigns. Each attribution provider has its own proprietary model for how to divide up credit for every conversion to the ad impressions that touched it. The most famous of these models is called last-touch attribution, where all credit is given to the last impression that the customer saw before converting. More advanced models use sophisticated sets of equations to assign credit along the entire path that the customer takes through the campaign, from touchpoint to touchpoint.

Simple or complex, the problem with these models is that they only measure how many conversions were touched by the campaign rather than how many were caused by the campaign. Unless you can tell the difference, it's impossible to evaluate how successful the campaign was.

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Going Solo: Hiring for In-House Programmatic

lindasughrue"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Linda Sughrue, director of service operations at DataXu.

There’s no denying that bringing programmatic media buying in-house is hot right now. The topic makes the rounds in articles, sales pitches and meetings every day.

There is, however, one aspect that is crucial to making the in-house trend a reality, but it hasn’t received much attention: hiring.

I’m all for savvy marketers bringing media buying in-house when it makes sense, but there are key roles they must fill in order to be successful.

The Must-Haves

The platform operator: This “hands-to-keyboard” operator creates the flights that focus on particular tasks such as retargeting or audience buying. The operator also traffics the ad creatives, manages and optimizes pace and performance and reports on key metrics.

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The Future of Programmatic: Programmatic Futures?

chris-ohara-new-2Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Chris O’Hara, co-founder and chief revenue officer at Bionic Advertising Systems.

Back in 2007, a company called TRAFFIQ started one of the first programmatic futures exchanges. The idea was simple. Publishers committed blocks of premium inventory into the exchange at a stated price. Advertisers could construct packages of premium inventory at discounted prices by making future commitments. Basically, it was a better, faster way to buy digital guaranteed.

The idea never really took off. Publishers didn’t understand how to value their inventory in the future. Real-time enablement was just starting to take off, and advertisers and their agencies were deeply stuck in manual inventory procurement run by spreadsheets and fax machines. TRAFFIQ went on to build some highly innovative workflow automation software and is now a successful technology-enabled digital agency.

Could programmatic futures thrive nearly eight years later in our fully programmatic world? Today’s “programmatic” is still very focused on RTB, inventory pools are still murky and technology’s ability to value publisher inventory still has a long way to go. What’s missing?

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As Platforms Proliferate, Which Ones Are Worth It For Marketers?

marcgrabowskiddt"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Marc Grabowski, CEO at Iris Mobile.

The landscape, language and measurement of new channels have changed to a point where traditional display inputs are no longer king. We have traversed iterations of performance measurement from cost per impression to click, like and install, which seemingly only encourages new platform purveyors to create more original nomenclature than ever before.

Our disparate mobile world owned by no one and shared by the likes of Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest raises the question of normalizing data. How can marketers optimize their budgets and time spent across platforms? How can marketers determine which platforms deserve their time and when they should let others move on research first?

Early Experience

With the emergence of new mobile platforms, new language, measurement and data attributes have been established faster than ever. Facebook most famously created a new language and economy defined by brand “fans” and object “likes,” long before a well-defined revenue or performance model was in place. In their early days, Facebook brands experimented with tactics to build a following to optimize organic message reach.

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With Google Barring DMP Pixels on GDN, Has It Thrown Baby Out With The Bath Water?

tom-chavezData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Tom Chavez, CEO at Krux.

Google recently informed its data-management platform (DMP) partners that it would impose new restrictions on pixels fired by campaigns that run on the Google Display Network (GDN).

Beginning Jan. 1, DMP pixels will not be allowed to fire on GDN impressions.

“[C]ollecting impression-level data via cookies or other mechanisms for purposes of subsequent retargeting, interest category categorization or syndication to other parties on Google Display Network inventory is prohibited,” the company said.

Google cited concerns for potential data leakage and pixel loading as reasons for the change. I commend Google for taking concrete steps to stave off these problems. Data leakage is a serious threat to the publisher’s greatest asset – its audience data. And pixel loading is troubling since it gums up web pages, prompting readers to click away.

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These Trends Are Disrupting The Ad Industry. Are You Looking at Them Wrong?

dennis-buchheimData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media. 

Today’s column is written by Dennis Buchheim, vice president of programmatic advertising products at Yahoo.

It seems that almost every day, marketers are faced with a new trend or media channel where they must ask: Do I jump in and risk poor results, or do I wait and risk being late to the game?

But it’s not often that we step back and examine how marketplace shifts interrelate. That is, what currents and eddies form in the wake of the multiple trends that are simultaneously altering the way we do business.

Here are four trends that have gradually – or, in some cases, rapidly – changed the advertising industry in the last few years:

PC to mobile: Since the advent of the smartphone, consumers’ eyes have moved from desktops to handheld devices, and content and ads have followed. This summer, mobile apps accounted for 51% of total digital content consumption.

TV to online media: As higher bandwidths have allowed better streaming video experiences, more people are watching video on devices other than televisions. Broadcast TV audience ratings have declined since 2002, and 2013 was the first year people spent more time with digital media than television.

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The Digital Advertising Industry Needs An Open Ecosystem

picard-datadrivenData-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Todays column is written by Eric Picard, CEO at Rare Crowds. 

Thanks to amazing new offerings from Facebook, Google, Amazon and others on deeply connected identity and tracking solutions, we are seeing two major developments. For the first time, connected identities across entire populations are available for targeting, tracking, reporting and analytics. But these identity pools exist within walled gardens, siloed to just one provider.

From a tactical and strategic point of view, I completely understand why companies create these walled-garden identity solutions. And to some extent, they will open their walls – metaphorically allowing outside vendors and partners to enter through checkpoints, accompanied by security and wearing clearly labeled badges. Nobody can fault a company like Facebook or Google for being careful about allowing entrée to their walled gardens. The potential for a PR backlash is significant, and that could cause the overall value of their offering to decline. So yes – it’s good to be cautious.

But it does create a significant issue for every publisher outside the top five or so because their first-party data pool is limited to the activity on their own site or apps. They don’t get access to cross-site activity, nor do they have a way to compete with the efforts of the biggest players on their own. It will be hard for publishers – even the large ones – to resist the momentum that will build to plug into these walled gardens, forcing publishers to effectively commoditize themselves in exchange for access to identity, targeting and analytics data.

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As Debate Rages, Some Brands Go In-House To Protect First-Party Data

jaystocki"Data-Driven Thinking " is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Jay Stocki, vice president of digital services at Experian Marketing Services.

If they haven’t heard it already, every chief marketing officer will soon be asked this question: “Do you plan to take your programmatic ad buying in-house?”

The in-house programmatic trend is really about something broader: Brand marketers are becoming more data-driven and want to empower their organizations to take an active role in the data-driven ecosystem.

When evaluating their place on the in-source vs. outsource spectrum, brands need to weigh a number of factors, including cost, trust, transparency, capabilities, experience and bandwidth. Some companies are moving toward an in-house model because they are concerned about protecting their first-party data. First-party data is one of a brand’s biggest competitive advantages. The last thing they want is to share it with outside organizations and, potentially, their competitors.

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