Vistar Media Taps Carrier Data To Target Consumers Across Mobile And OOH

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VistarMediaHere’s a potential new acronym for you: MOOH – that’s to say, mobile out-of-home.

Digital OOH programmatic player Vistar Media launched an extension of its cross-screen offering Wednesday via a partnership with AirSage, a little-known Atlanta-based company that collects data on consumer location and population movement.

AirSage captures and analyzes in the neighborhood of 15 billion anonymous cellular signal data points every day – a trove of information for companies looking to serve targeted, real-time messages to on-the-move consumers via mobile and OOH.

“Each time a device makes contact with a cell tower, AirSage captures that location,” said Andrea Moe, VP of product management and marketing at AirSage.

Historically, AirSage has sold its data to government entities, the transportation industry and commercial enterprises to help determine traffic patterns or plan road improvements based on signal clusters, which could represent areas of roadway congestion. The company has also recently moved into travel and tourism and market research.

The partnership with Vistar represents AirSage’s first foray into advertising.

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Startup Lytics Raises $7M, Wants To Help You Build Your Own Marketing Cloud

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james mcdermott lyticsThe value of a marketing cloud, as Forrester Research pointed out Tuesday, is in the level of its integration.

But Portland, Oregon-based startup Lytics takes the position that whatever level of integration the big-name marketing suites offer simply isn’t enough. The company, which started in 2012, made its “marketing activation platform” generally available on Wednesday and revealed $7 million in Series A funding led by Comcast Ventures, bringing its total to $9.2 million.

Lytics provides the glue that lets marketers link their disparate technologies. Its value proposition is that it enables companies to build their own clouds out of various point solutions, merging data from systems likes email, social media, web and point-of-sale quickly and easily.

It accomplishes this heady task via 80 connectors that link to parts of the marketing ecosystem, as well as through API connections, said company CEO and co-founder James McDermott.

“Fundamentally our platform was designed to integrate with different marketing execution tools,” he said.

Lytics’ self-serve platform consists of data-management tools (it’s not a DMP, McDermott insisted) and has a layer of analytics designed to make predictions, such as which customers might churn, and suggestions, such as how and where a company should message those churn risks.

Lytics has 15 beta clients including Intel, Condé Nast and DirecTV.
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Retargeting By Any Other Name Is Still Retargeting

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justin-petty"Data-Driven Thinking" is written by members of the media community and contains fresh ideas on the digital revolution in media.

Today’s column is written by Justin Petty, vice president of global media and partnerships at dunnhumby.

We’ve all done it. Days after browsing a product online, maybe across several different sites, we see it out of the corner of our eye on the screen. “You know you want me. C’mon, just click this ad.”

For many of us, it works. We’re sold.

It’s similar to a friend saying, “You look great in that jacket, just get it.” We might not buy immediately; we‘re uncertain or think we might find it cheaper elsewhere. But we like instant gratification, so typically only wait a couple days at most before breaking down and buying. And that’s one of the reasons retargeting works.

Retargeting has always been a label applied to advertisements triggered by a consumer’s online behavior. In today’s world of big data, the lines are blurring between offline consumer behavior and online ad targeting. In essence, everyone can now retarget, even if it’s not labeled as such.

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Dynamic Price Floors Perpetuate An Ad Stack Cold War

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willdohertyThe Sell Sider” is a column written by the sell side of the digital media community.

Today’s column is written by Will Doherty, senior director of business development at Index Exchange, a division of Casale Media Inc.

The jig is up. And it’s been up for a long while. It’s time to move past dynamic floors.

They simply have no place in the current programmatic ecosystem. They are shortsighted and deny publishers the opportunity to work closely with their clients – many of whom are gearing up for a programmatic-only future. You’re not simply short-changing a bidder by deploying dynamic floors, you’re hindering your ability to support accurate price discovery for buyers. If they can’t price it, they won’t buy it. More importantly, any effort to obscure the value or credibility of any given impression – to represent it as something it’s not – is deceptive.

Dynamic floors, or “soft floors,” allow publishers to create artificial market density in order to drive up the cost of a given impression. In any open exchange, buyers only expect to pay slightly more than the next highest bid. If a buyer bids $2 and the next highest bid is $1.50, most auction mechanics would sell that impression to the buyer at $1.51. When a dynamic floor is introduced into this equation, the SSP will create “phantom demand” that would price the bid at $5 as if that demand actually existed. That figure now represents the high end of the auction. But since it doesn’t exist, the SSP will sell that impression to the buyer at $2, since it is the highest bid below the dynamic floor of $5. This is an artificial price increase of nearly 33% for the buyer.

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Apple May Add Pay To iAd; MediaMath Does $1M In Video

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iadappleplayHere's today's AdExchanger.com news round-up... Want it by email? Sign-up here.

Apple Eyes Tap-To-Buy

Apple is rumored to be bringing its mobile payment system, Apple Pay, to iAd. Digiday reports that the integration would embed a tap-to-buy button in mobile ads, mirroring similar moves by Facebook and Twitter earlier this year. Jeff Malmad, managing director of mobile at Mindshare, said the move might help Apple “close the loop” in terms of attribution. “The mobile experience has transformed the shopping experience” added Malmad, “and the ability to understand what consumers are doing on an aggregate level [with iAd] is very powerful for brands.” More.

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Yahoo Announces 'Material' Mobile Revenue In Earnings

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yahoo mobileYahoo says its investments in mobile have paid off. The company announced its mobile revenue in Q3 exceeded $200 million, or 20% of its $1.1 billion in GAAP revenue.

Mobile revenue doubled year over year, including both search and display.

Revenue growth on mobile far outpaced user growth. 550 million people are mobile monthly active users across Yahoo and Tumblr, a growth rate of 17% year over year.

"Not only are our mobile products attracting praise and engagement from users and industry awards, they are generating meaningful revenue for Yahoo," said CEO Marissa Mayer. She expects mobile revenue will exceed $1.2 billion this year.

Yahoo's story has been all about mobile. It acquired Flurry, a mobile analytics company, a few months ago. Before that, it made dozens of small acquihires generally centered around mobile apps.

This quarter, it relaunched its Mail, news and finance apps.

Mayer emphasized that mobile and desktop monetize completely differently. PCs use banner ads, while "mobile apps monetize through native ads," Mayer said. Forty-four percent of display ads are native.

Declining Display

Display is a "drag" on Yahoo's business to the tune of $60 million a quarter, Mayer said.

While Yahoo's search business posted decent results, with price-per-click rising and click volume flat, display told another story. Once again, Yahoo saw more ads sold at lower prices. Read the rest of this entry »


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Forrester: Adobe Marketing Cloud Makes Big Waves, SAS Is 'Best-Kept Secret'

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cory munchbach forresterForrester Research crowned Adobe Marketing Cloud in its first-ever ranking of enterprise marketing software suites – informally called “marketing clouds.”

The report, compiled by analysts Cory Munchbach and Rusty Warner and released Tuesday, encompassed eight vendors (Adobe, Salesforce.com, SAS, Teradata, IBM, Oracle, SAP and Marketo). Munchbach and Warner interviewed three clients from each vendor and tallied 53 client responses to an online survey. The solutions were evaluated in Q2 2014.

Adobe’s top positioning had to do with the strength of its core offering and its product strategy. Salesforce.com was slightly weaker in its offering and strategy, but was still in the top “leader” category, according to Forrester.

IBM and, surprisingly, Oracle and SAS Institute were solidly in the second-tier “strong performers” category.

Independent marketing automation provider Marketo and data analytics company Teradata, which has what it calls an “integrated marketing cloud,” hovered between “strong performers” and the third-tier “contenders” categories.

And SAP, which has the hybris commerce suite and struck a deal in March to resell Adobe Marketing Cloud, had a better product offering than Marketo, but its strategy placed it solidly in the “contender” category.
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Q3: Omnicom Reveals How It Fares On Programmatic

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omnicom-wrenOmnicom Group's programmatic buying discipline is still in its early days, the agency holding company emphasized during its Q3 2014 earnings call Tuesday.

Programmatic buying constitutes just south of 2% of the company’s overall revenue, which reached $3.75 billion during the quarter, up 7.4% YoY. Most of the growth came from the North America region, which was up 8.9% YoY (compared to the low single-digit growth of other regions).

Omnicom CEO John Wren attributed North America’s increase partially to growth in programmatic buying – as well as other factors like fewer losses and new client wins.

Omnicom, he said, saw a significant uptick in programmatic toward the end of Q3 2013 and throughout Q4 2013 and Wren projected at least double-digit growth for programmatic into Q4 and throughout 2015.

However, he added a caveat, saying it’s still “early days.”
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Findings From VivaKi AOD, IAB Support Mobile’s Rising Supremacy

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CPMDigital ad revenues in the US hit an historic high in the first half of 2014, reaching $23.1 billion, according to the IAB’s Internet Advertising Revenue Report released Monday. Notably, the IAB reported that mobile jumped 76% YoY and overtook banner ads.

In another Monday release, the VivaKi AOD Benchmark Report saw CPMs increase across display, social, video and mobile channels. The AOD report notes that CPMs within mobile, which range from $0.52 to $1.94 in Q2 2014, are generally on the rise and that advertisers can expect this trend to continue.

“In general, we’ve seen CPMs go up over the last five quarters or so, across verticals,” VivaKi SVP of Analytics Shirley Xu-Weldon told AdExchanger. The reason is real-time bidding, which optimizes the value of each impression based on the number of bidders.

According to Xu-Weldon, targeting adds another dimension to rising CPMs. “If we know something concrete about a user," she said, "if they fall into a particular cookie pool for example, that becomes even more expensive because the impression is already qualified in some way to potential buyers.”

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Nielsen And Adobe Ink A Deal In The Name Of Cross-Platform Measurement

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NielsenDCRNielsen and Adobe revealed a partnership Tuesday designed to combine Nielsen’s digital audience measurement products with Adobe Analytics and Adobe Primetime, the company’s platform for online TV delivery and monetization, making both available to joint Nielsen/Adobe clients through Adobe Marketing Cloud.

The result is Digital Content Ratings (DCR), a cross-platform census-based metric that aims to do for digital media what Nielsen’s Online Campaign Ratings (OCR) does for advertising initiatives or what its TV ratings do for broadcast TV.

To that end, DCR looks at digital media consumption across online TV, video, games, audio or text via all the digital content usual suspects – desktop, mobile, game consoles or over-the-top (OTT) boxes, like Roku, Apple TV or Google TV.

Joint Adobe/Nielsen clients ESPN, Sony Pictures, Turner Broadcasting, Univision and Viacom are taking part in the DCR beta test. Nielsen and Adobe expect to make the product generally available in 2015, although which quarter remains to be seen, Ashley Still, Adobe’s senior director of product management, told AdExchanger.

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